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Why didn't my email get delivered? or where did my email go?

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9 comments

  • sawbuck
    Thanks Peter for bringing this together in one location.
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  • _brendan
    [quote="cPanelPeter, post: 1557882"> [list]
  • Authentication issues (the most common). ...snip... [size=+1]Not permitted to relay errors Another common message we see is this one: Please turn on SMTP Authentication in your mail client. mx.someserver.net (mx.someserver.net) [xxx.xxx.xxx.xx]:4471 is not permitted to relay through this server without authentication.
    This is pretty self explanatory, and usually means that the MUA (Mail User Agent) which is usually Outlook doesn't have the "My SMTP server requires authentication" option checked. Thank you, cPanelPeter
    When using an external filter service, the "Mail Exchanger" configuration needs to be set to "Local Mail Exchanger". Else, what happens here is that with the default config of "Automatically Detect Configuration", cPanel automatically detects that the MX record "points elsewhere" and disables local delivery. The end-result is that when the filter service attempts to deliver the mail, the server responds with the "Please turn on SMTP Authentication" error above. Currently there is no feature to tell cPanel that the MX IP address(es) is/are "local", thus you have to manually (or via default-config/script) ensure that the mail is set to "Local Exchanger" explicitly. An alternative, if the MX IP addresses are *NOT* used by the inbound filters to deliver *to* the cPanel server, may be to put the MX IP addresses onto the "lo" interface (remember to enable ARP filtering!), thus ensuring that the server *thinks* the IP address is local, thereby ensuring that "Automatic" works as intended. Though the server admin may have configured this correctly in the beginning, there isn't much to stop resellers/end-users from breaking the configs when they see the "recommended" text next to the "Automatic" option.
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  • syam1353
    As for Gmail, any email account @mydomain.com are still being routed directly to the "Spam" folder. I have not heard any reported issues with other major email providers. Just Gmail. But I tested it myself yesterday sending to my own Gmail account and the email was delivered to the Spam folder. I am completely stumped with regards to what is causing this issue, but it is becoming a problem as Gmail is such a popular email provider and we have many clients with Gmail addresses. I am not sure how this can fixed and also not sure as to why the situation is not being replicated on your end.
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  • crazyaboutlinux
    superb explanation about NDR
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  • Mark Francis
    I would like to point out that in some situations, emails cansimply disappear. Some ISPs silently delete incoming emails that they consider to be spam. They do not send it to a spam folder, nor do they reply with a bounce message. The email is simply deleted. One such ISP is Heart Internet, which is why I took my business elsewhere after they started deleting emails from - Removed -, which is a perfectly respectable peer-to-peer finance business.
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  • cPanelPeter cPanel Staff
    Hello, They are not really supposed to delete messages. However, spam is not considered to be legitimate email so if a message has been determined to be spam (spam score in the double digits), I personally have no problem with the ISP deleting it for me. I always recommend reading the terms and conditions carefully and I expect they'll be covered for deleting the if they are coming in via a known cluster of spam servers. I would expect an ability to whitelist however.
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  • justjaph
    [quote="Mark Francis, post: 1760352">I would like to point out that in some situations, emails cansimply disappear. Some ISPs silently delete incoming emails that they consider to be spam. They do not send it to a spam folder, nor do they reply with a bounce message. The email is simply deleted. One such ISP is Heart Internet, which is why I took my business elsewhere after they started deleting emails from - Removed -, which is a perfectly respectable peer-to-peer finance business.
    That is particularly true with M$ services (hotmail/Office365/live.com/outlook.com): the message is "250 accepted for delivery" and then disappears in some blackhole without any warning to either parties whatsoever. The topping on the cake is that there isn't a way to know if the email sent from your IP addresses is or isn't "sinkholed" until your customers start reporting that their messages aren't going anywhere fast (and then the "delist" process that is a (bad) joke)... Regards,
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  • arjunrishi
    Good explanation, thanks a lot . its very use full for me also.
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  • mutilateadoll2
    This is what I need to solve the same problem of email delivery! Thanks much!
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